A Funeral Procession at Arlington National Cemetery - Photo by  SFC Leslie A. Beltran, 2nd Battalion, Army Reserve Careers Division

A Funeral Procession at Arlington National Cemetery – Honoring the Fallen

“Who kept the faith and fought the fight; The glory theirs, the duty ours.”

 

About This Quote: “Memorial Day,” a poem by Wallace Bruce, is the source of this patriotic quote. The poem was first published in a book called Wanderers in 1907. The glorious men “who kept the faith and fought the fight” are the soldiers who fought and died for their country; the citizens who owe their freedom to these individuals now have the duty to uphold the values for which these soldiers fought. Specifically, the poem is about the soldiers who fought in the Civil War.

From 25 Glorious Memorial Day Quotes by Shannon George

 

11th Aviation Command and Army Reserve Careers Division 2014 Best Warrior

Day 2 of the Best Warrior Competition started with a 6.2 mile road march in Fort Knox on May 1.

Day 2 of the Best Warrior Competition started with a 6.2 mile road march in Fort Knox on May 1.
Photo by Beverly Denny

FORT KNOX, Ken.

After four days of exhausting competition, the 11th Aviation Command and the Army Reserve Careers Division announced the winners of their Combined Best Warrior Competition held at Fort Knox, Kentucky, April 30 to May 3.

Tested in the areas of physical fitness, rifle and pistol marksmanship, Assemble and disassemble of various weapons, land navigation, a timed 6.2-ruck march, Obstacle Course, urban orienteering, Urban Assault Course, fifteen Army warrior tasks, hand-to-hand combat tournaments, board appearance, military knowledge, a written exam and an essay twelve Soldiers competed for the title of “Best Warrior.”

The competition has two categories to determine the top enlisted Soldiers, junior enlisted, (private through specialist), and the Noncommissioned Officer (NCO) category (corporal through Sgt. 1st Class). Soldiers with the highest cumulative scores in their category win the title of Best Warrior and will have the chance to compete at the Army Reserve level for its Best Warrior Competition later this year at Fort McCoy, Wis.

For the 11th Aviation Command, Sgt. Henry F. Cocker won first place in the NCO category. Originally, from the Hawaiian Islands, Sgt. Cocker now serves as a 92Y, Unit Supply Specialist at the 2-228th Aviation Regiment in Lakehurst, N.J. He has been an Army Reserve Soldier for six years.

Spc. Cameron A. Caylor, a native of Spring, Texas, assigned to C Co. 1-158th Aviation Regiment as a 15R, AH-64 Attack Helicopter Repairer in Conroe, Texas won first place in the junior enlisted category.

Spc. Caylor chose to compete in the Best Warrior Competition to further his military career but also to be best that he can be. Stating, “This competition means to me that I will expose any flaws that I may have and then I will know what to work on to better myself as a Soldier.”

Sgt. 1st Class Kyle A. Vanderlaan is Army Reserve Careers Division NCO Best Warrior. Sgt. 1st Class Vanderlaan serves as a 79V Army Reserve Career Counselor with the Army Reserve Careers Division, 10th Battalion. Sgt. 1st Class Vanderlaan would ultimately like to become a valuable resource for the Army and military community as a professional Soldier in whatever capacity that may be.

To view photos and video of the 2014 Best Warrior Competition for the 11th Aviation and Army Reserve Careers Division like us on FaceBook at StayArmyReserve.

(Note: The Army Reserve Careers Division did not have competitors in the junior enlisted ranks.)

Best Warrior Competition 2014

“I chose to compete in the Best Warrior Competition because it is a great way to not only test, but develop my warrior skills. I believe that the experience I will gain from training for and competing in the Best Warrior Competition will subsequently enhance my ability to be an excellent NCO.”

  Staff Sgt. Nathan D. Partridge

Army Reserve Soldiers from the 11th Aviation Command and the Army Reserve Careers Division compete at Fort Knox, Ky. to win their respective command title as “Best Warrior”.

Army Reserve Soldiers from the 11th Aviation Command and the Army Reserve Careers Division equipment is inspected as part of their in processing  for the Best Warrior Competition at Fort Knox, Ky.

Army Reserve Soldiers from the 11th Aviation Command and the Army Reserve Careers Division equipment is inspected as part of their inprocessing for the Best Warrior Competition at Fort Knox, Ky.

Challenged physically and mentally, competitors are pushed to the limit, the competition requires strength, endurance, and perseverance, as well as being technical efficient in your warrior task.

The first day consisted of the Army Physical Fitness Test, Weapons Qualification with the M9 and day and night Qualifications on the M4, an obstacle course and several mystery events. Before the competition is over the competitors may complete challenges such as a 10K Road March with a 35 pound rucksack, urban orienteering, combatives, urban operation challenge, land navigation, mystery events, written exams and board appearances.

To follow this weeks events and see more photos go to https://www.facebook.com/stayarmyreserve.

Remember to take the extra time to leave a remark to encourage the Soldiers and and then like us!

Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer addresses special mission’s team

Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer Phyllis Wilson

Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer Phyllis Wilson.

Story and Photos by Beverly Denny

Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer Phyllis Wilson addressed the 79V Special Missions NCOICs at Gillem Enclave in Atlanta, March 18 during the Army Reserve Careers Division training. The primary point she wanted to impart is to focus on the goal of increasing warrant officer numbers in the Army Reserve to 3,500 by June 30, 2015. She stated, “We have held chronically around 3,200 for the past several years”.

Increasing the total to 3,500 in about 15 months doesn’t mean growing by just 300 because you have to take into account the 250-300 that will leave in that time frame.

CCWO Wilson asked the group to tell her how she and other command chiefs can help. We’ve heard what 79Vs want are leads, and that’s what we owe you, she said.

When grooming Soldiers to become warrant officers, having them dig in deep into their specialties is ideal. CCWO Wilson was able to stay immersed in intelligence when she served as a senior intelligence analyst. It was her job to brief a four-star general about the biggest dogs in Al Qaeda. Stating, and that’s what a warrant officer should be. They should have “a fire in their gut to do what they love,” NCO’s are the backbone of the Army and the connective tissue of the warrant officer cohort.

A quandary we’re facing with increasing the number of warrant officers is there are solid Soldiers who are good enough to be a 2LT or CSM but somehow can’t be accepted as a WO1. We’re missing out on a huge pocket pool there, she said.

Master Sgt. Jeremy Kasten of Birmingham made a suggestion for dealing with dwindling numbers of NCO’s: instead of asking for waivers, let’s look more realistically at prerequisites, saying it could help open up more applicants.

When asked about the problem of receiving requests for a warrant letter of recommendation for a Soldier you don’t know personally, CCWO Wilson said there are work-arounds. One way is to reach out to a senior warrant officer geographically close to the Soldier in question and ask if they can meet and send the assessment so you can feel confident signing off on the candidate. “Those kinds of networks encourage warrant officers to communicate with each other.”

Collaboration between the National Guard and Army Reserve is also a factor to consider. In June there will be a get together for the Guard and Reserve command chiefs in Little Rock. Reaching out to collaborate will help the Reserve with the goal of increasing warrant officer numbers to the 3,500 mark by next June.

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Developing Leaders in the Command

Lt. Colonel Anthony A. Francia Jr., Commander for the 5th Battalion, Army Reserve Career Division, had the opportunity to address the audience about career management and promotion boards.

Lt. Colonel Anthony A. Francia Jr., Commander for the 5th Battalion, Army Reserve Career Division, had the opportunity to address the audience about career management and promotion boards.

By 1st Mission Support Command

Ft. Buchanan, PR – Over the weekend Commanders, Command Sergeants Major and First Sergeants from the 1st Mission Support Command (1st MSC), US Army Reserve in Puerto Rico, participate at the Command Team Development Workshop, 24 – 25 Jan.

During this event, the Command Teams of the 1st MSC received orientations on the following topics: safety, medical readiness, equal opportunity, promotion boards, career management, food services, and emergency management, among others. With the intent to increase readiness within the command, this workshop allows them to build leadership dynamics for Troop Program Units (TPU) and share strategies with other TPU leadership teams.

Brig. Gen. Jose R. Burgos, Commanding General of the 1st MSC, started the event sharing his priorities and command philosophy with all the attendees, which include; Mission, the Army Values, Discipline, People, Safety and his expectations to continue the success of the 1st MSC.

“Provide First Class Mission Command for assigned and attached forces with Ready, Resilient and Relevant leaders who are competent in their duties, demonstrate character in their decisions and actions, and display unquestionable commitment to the mission despite the risk, challenge, and adversity.” – mentioned Brig. Gen. Burgos on his command philosophy.

Lt. Colonel Anthony A. Francia Jr., Commander for the 5th Battalion, Army Reserve Career Division, and Major Donald Saxon, Career Management Officer, were among the workshop attendees. They had the opportunity to address the audience about career management and promotion boards.

The 1st Mission Support Command is planning to conduct more events like this Workshop at least every 6 months to keep the readiness of the units in the command.
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To see more photos from this event go to http://www.flickr.com/photos/1stmsc/12176670704/in/set-72157640217161216
Photo is copy righted by 1st Mission Support Command

ARCD All Army 2014

ARCD All Army Experience

Army Reserve Careers Division Career Counselors maintain our Reserve force by retaining good Soldiers. They also need to maintain and build their personal military skills. Participation in organized training is the best way to do so. ARCD sent a contingent of ARCCs to compete in the All Army Small Arms Championships, an advanced combat live-fire training event. Training and skill exercises held are applicable to all military small arms firing disciplines and the event had 213 competitors this year.

“This is my first All-Army but won’t be my last,” said Sgt. 1st Class Annette Habel, an ARCC from Clairmont, Fla. “I volunteered to come compete and am really glad I did. I foresee that we’re going to have more females come out next year and give the guys more competition.” The pistol events were Habel’s favorites, which included a team event with run requiring all team members to cross the finish line and then shoot together.“This is my first All Army. I’m learning a lot and enjoying this for sure,” said Army Reserve Career Counselor Sgt. 1st Class Ismael Reyna. All Army includes rifle shooting on Known Distance ranges out to 500 yards with all shots marked and scored. For Reyna and many other Soldiers, events like this are their first opportunity to shoot extended distances with full feedback.

In addition to bringing out new shooters, ARCD also boasts a number of experienced, high-level competition shooters, including several assigned to the Army Reserve Marksmanship Program as additional duty. Army Reserve Careers Division Small Arms Team “A”, comprised of team members Staff Sgt. John Arcularius Jr., Sgt. 1st Class John Buol, Sgt. 1st Class Charles Parker and Master Sgt. John McFarland, placed in the top three of all team events for the entire competition. Ultimately, the ARCD team came in second overall. With over 4,000 aggregate match points available at the event, the team match was decided by 0.17 points.

Individually, Army Reserve Careers Division’s own Sgt. Major James Mauer, 3rd Battalion earned his last needed “leg” points and was awarded the Distinguished Rifleman Badge. The Excellence In Competition program was created in 1894 and a total of 3,304 Soldiers have received the Distinguished Rifleman badge since.

In addition to helping the ARCD team, Sgt. 1st Class John Buol won two overall individual aggregates at the event – Combat Pistol and Combined Arms – and was second overall.

ARCD needs ARCCs that retain good personal individual Soldier skills so they may better relate to the Soldier’s they seek to retain. Small arms skills are the top of Soldier-relevant skills. As the results at All Army prove, ARCD Soldiers can shoot!

Results and photos of the event:

http://www.usaac.army.mil/amu/competitions/2014/2014%20allarmyresults.asp

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